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history-churchyard

Founded in 1851 by the Reverend Henry Brown, then rector of Old St. David’s in Radnor, the parish that was to become the Church of the Redeemer spent its first thirty years in a church building located at the corner of Lancaster Avenue and Buck Lane. Neither Mr. Brown nor his successor remained long, but with the appointment of the Rev. Edward Lycett in the fall of 1856, the parish began an era of extensive development that continued during his twenty-two year tenure.

In 1860, with foresight and good judgment, the vestry purchased the ground on which the church now stands, "containing 9 ¼ acres at $150 an acre." The present site was unoccupied from 1861 to 1872 when the Rectory was built at a cost of $12,700 and located in what was described as "a forest of trees." In 1871, a committee of the vestry reported on "a detailed plan for laying out the grounds for a cemetery including the site for a new church." Funds were raised, the building was designed in the Gothic Revival style by noted church architect Charles M. Burns, and on Easter Sunday, 1881, the first services were held in the new church.

Additions followed: the Parish House, also designed by Burns, went up in 1885; a choir room was added to the church in 1891 and the next year even brought steam heat! In 1912, two bays were added to the nave, increasing the seating capacity in the church by a third. The last major addition was the beautiful chapel, built in 1914. Throughout the church and chapel, memorial windows, created by some of the renowned artists in stained glass, were installed as memorials—most of them dating from the last few years of the nineteenth century and the first two decades of the twentieth. In 1958 the Parish House nearly doubled in size with the addition of classrooms and office space.

Currently, The Redeemer sits on eleven acres of land that includes the churchyard and memorial garden. The present rector is the 13th to serve in this capacity, and through the 130 years of its history, the parish has supported many assisting and associate clergy who have offered distinguished service to the Church here and elsewhere. Throughout these years, the parish has been blessed and sustained by the dedicated service of its members on church committees, in outreach and pastoral care ministries, in the ministries of Christian formation and music, and in the many ministries that facilitate and enhance worship. The Church of the Redeemer contributes to and actively participates in the life of the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania.

 

You can view "A Brief History of the Parish" 1851-1951 by Canon Ernest C. Earp, written for the Hundreth Anniversary of the Parish in 1951.

Listing of Rectors of The Redeemer

   

 

Church of the Redeemer Rectors  
Number Name   Start year End Year
Henry Brown

1851

1855
2 George S. Rider

1856

1856

3 Edward L. Lycett

1856

1878

4 Edward S. Watson 

1878

1886

5 James Haughton

1987

1909

6 George C. Carter

1910

1929

7 Ernest C. Earp

1929

1949

8 Thorne Sparkman

1949

1966

9 Timothy Pickering

1967

1989

10 Bruce Jacobsen

1989

1989

11 Timothy Dobbins

1990

1997

12 Gary Jones

1999

2000

13 Gary Hall

2002

2004

14 Peter W. Sipple

2004

2009

15 Peter T. Vanderveen

2009

 
       

 

Titanic Plaque NEW

Church of the Redeemer was the home parish of John Bordland Thayer, victim of the Titanic disaster. This plaque in the church marks a memorial to his life. See below for the actual text of the plaque.

Redeemerites Mrs. John Borland Thayer (Marian Longstreth Morris), 39, from Haverford, Pennsylvania, her husband John B. Thayer and son Jack Thayer boarded the Titanic as first class passengers. Mrs. Thayer’s maid Margaret Fleming travelled with them.

Mrs. Thayer, son Jack and Margaret Fleming survived. John B. Thayer perished and his body was never recovered. A memorial placque in the church (immediately behind the organ console) is dedicated in his memory.

Marian Thayer died on April 14, 1944—32 years to the day after the sinking of the Titantic. She is buried in the churchyard (on the Pennswood side of the church). Her son John B. Thayer (Jack) is also buried in the churchyard (in the Cassatt family plot on the driveway side of the church).

For much more interesting information on the Thayers, visit the Titanic website at: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org

TO         THE         GREATER         GLORY         OF         GOD

IN
LOVING
MEMORY OF

JOHN
BORLAND
THAYER

        APRIL 21 1862                                                             APRIL 15 1912

BE THOU FAITH
FUL UNTO DEATH
AND I WILL GIVE
THEE A CROWN
OF LIFE.
+MARK THE
PERFECT MAN
AND BEHOLD
THE UPRIGHT
FOR THE END
OF THAT MAN
IS PEACE.

FROM HIS WIFE AND MOTHER
A HERO OF
THE TITANIC DISASTER

PERFECT IN EVERY RELA
TIONSHIP OF LIFE HE DIED
AS HE LIVED AN EXAMPLE
TO ALL
GREATER LOVE HATH NO
MAN THAN THIS THAT A
A MAN LAY DOWN HIS LIFE
FOR HIS FRIENDS
+ HE RESTS WHERE LOVE,
LIFE, AND DEATH ALL
FOUND HIM TRUE.
+ HIS MEMORY AS IMPER
ISHABLE AS HIS SHROUD
THE SEA.

I WILL BRING
MY PEOPLE
AGAIN FROM
THE DEPTHS
OF THE SEA +
++ AND GOD
SHALL WIPE
AWAY ALL
TEARS FROM
THEIR EYES

GOD IS LOVE

Church of the Redeemer - 230 Pennswood Road - Bryn Mawr, PA 19010